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Are You Ready for A Super-Secret Missions to the Edge of Space?

SR-72 Darkbird

Price: $17.99

PN: 05010
Skill Level 4: Slightly Challenging
Length: 14.00" (35.56 cm)
Weight: 1.00 oz (28.35 g)
Diameter (Max): 0.74" (1.88 cm)
Fin Count: 2
Motor Size: 13mm
Recovery System: Glider. Power pod (engine) comes down via a streamer.
Launch Pad Type: Low Power
Manufactured by: Apogee

In Stock

Call us to order if out of stock or current stock is insufficient for your order. We can make more!
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The SR-72 is a futuristic stealthy flighter jet, loosely based on the SR-71 flown by the CIA. In this new and better version, the aircraft is rocket powered. And when it reaches the end of its boost, it ejects the core tube, and flies gently back to the ground. It is a roaring good time!




SR-72 Darkbird

If you are like most futurists, you like rockets that have a swoopy aerodynamic look to them. The "SR-72 Darkbird" is one such model. It may look like an airplane, but trust me; it's all rocket power.

The stealthy SR-72 aircraft blasts off on rocket power,taking you along on its super-secret mission. You'll be pleased by its awesome liftoff. It is both visually spectacular, and an auditory blast. This is no woosh-pop rocket. After climbing straight-up to fantastic heights on the roar of rocket power, the SR-72 transitions to its primary mission as a high speed aircraft.

And when its mission is completed, it glides gracefully back to the ground; ready to take on its next top secret mission. You'll swear when watching it, that it looks like a real airplane screaming over the launch field.

Because of the unique design of the airplane, it can be prepped and launched again in seconds!

The kit contains a durable injection molded plastic nose cone, precision die-cut balsa wings, vacuum form inlet cones, and a unique paper canopy on the top of the fuselage. It also includes special templates that allow the model to be assembled quickly and easily.


Alternate Paint Scheme
Renown rocket designer, Shrox, has come up with an alternate paint scheme for this SR-72 Darkbird kit. It resembles a NASA high-altitude research aircraft. If you'd like to check it out, click here now.

The Secret Missions of the SR-72 Darkbird

The below document has been circulating around the internet recently. It appears to be a briefing by CIA aircraft pilot for a member of the Senate Arms Services Committee. I don't know if it is true, but it will make you think.

Senator, I know there are many taxpayers that are wondering about the SR-72 Darkbird, and its secretive missions. I'll leave it up to you to decide what information to release to them, but I'll give you a little history of the plane. I'll follow this with a briefing about the type of top-secret missions we CIA pilots performed, and conclude with our recommendations about the bill that has come before the Senate.

You may know about that other aircraft called the SR-71. It was a fast plane - with speeds around Mach 3.3. With the SR-72, the original objective was to fly even faster, and to be in the air longer without having to perform mid-air refueling.

The SR-72 was designed for the CIA by a front company called Apogee Components. The development of the black program was hidden quite easily in the CIA's budget. Until recently, you might not even have known it existed. The first flights of the aircraft took place in the early 70's over sparsely populated island chains in the Pacific Ocean. To this day the airplane's top speed is considered a national secret. But let's say it is well over Mach 4.4.

Suffice it to say, it is very difficult to reach these speeds without the assistance of rocket power. That is why the core module of the SR-72 houses the powerful and ultra-efficient J7 rocket engine. It is a remarkable engine, as it is able to use atmospheric oxygen that is ducted in from the two outboard engine cowlings. This saves a lot of weight, since separate oxidizer is not needed for the rocket power portion of the flight. This allows the plane to carry much more fuel, giving it the loiter time over the target that is required for many of its missions.

As you know Senator, the old SR-71 did not carry armaments, whereas, the SR-72 is a CIA airplane, it does. The primary weapon is a large Bolaero/Z Air-to-Space missile. Because of the high launch speeds of the SR-72, the missile can reach targets that may be in geosynchronous orbit.

Initially, early missions of the plane where to take out "ORANGE Country's" space launchers. You probably remember that the success rate of those launches appeared to be dismal. Most people thought that the "ORANGE Country's" space program was run by a lot of incompetent engineers. But in actuality, we took out the launchers with air-to-space missiles fired from the SR-72 Darkbird.

That's why the need for extra speed was critical. We'd loiter over the mountains waiting for a rocket launch. If everything went right, we pilots would get a message from CIA headquarters about the countdown. As you know, it was part of the CIA's job to have intelligence agents on the ground monitoring all their launches.

If the launch looked imminent, we'd ignite the J7 rocket engine to full thrust. It was a real kick in the butt as I'd burn through the upper layers of the atmosphere and try to be in a position to launch my own air-to-space missile. Our objective was to get a good run on the rocket just as it cleared 30,000 feet. The faster we went, the greater the possibility of a successful termination, since the window of opportunity was so very short.

We SR-72 pilots weren't successful every time, but we hit enough of the rockets in the first few months of operation to make their space program very expensive. Because of this, they had to divert money from other military programs. It was a double bonus for our side.

Did "Orange Country" know what we were up to? You bet. Once we ignited the J7 engine, we were very easy to track. But by that time we were already chasing their rocket. And yes; they did all types of things to try to circumvent our plans. Launching decoy rockets worked for a while, so did having a fake countdown. But a lot of times, we knew they had limited launch windows for their rockets, so those missions were a bit more successful.

We never went after manned vehicles; and they knew it. It would have drawn too much attention to their space program. People would have demanded answers, and we might have ended up exposing our own SR-72 aircraft.

They couldn't protest against our flights publicly; probably because they couldn't face their population with the news that we had a plane capable of such performance. They took great pride in their aviation industry, and they just couldn't admit they weren't able to create a plane with similar capabilities.

Also, until 1994, it was a federal crime to take any photographs of the SR-72, so the "Orange Country" had no idea what the plane looked like, nor how big it actually was. While the SR-72 has a similar shape to the SR-71, it is a much bigger aircraft. It is almost twice the size!

It was a very stealthy aircraft while operating under normal scram-jet power; although it is a bit noisy. But flying up above most of the atmosphere muffled the ground noise to a significant extent. But once we ignited the J7, we were very easy to spot on radar, and with infrared tracking systems.

By around late 1974, the "Orange Country" had developed significant countermeasures that made our missions nearly impractical. They figured out how to stage their rockets at critical times in the flight, which would present multiple targets to the missile we fired at them. This would confuse the missile's guidance system, and it usually went after the large portion of the rocket. Obviously, that was the wrong part as far as we were concerned.

Senator, now I'll get to the part about the aliens.

On April 1, 1975 an Air Force F4 Phantom jet mysteriously exploded while operating a routine training flight over Colorado. That is what the news reports said anyway. But another F4 flying in formation witnessed what happened. A Unidentified Flying Object swooped down on the first F4, and launched some type of hi-speed projectile. After that plane was destroyed, it came after the second F4. It was also hit by a projectile, but the pilot was able to eject successfully.

SR-72 header card artworkTo this day, we don't know where the UFO came from. But this was a far bigger national security threat to us than "Orange Country." We are dealing with an advisory that is much more technologically advanced than we are. So we ceased SR-72 missions to destroy "Orange Country's" space launchers.

Heck, Senator, we knew that our entire planet was at risk. So we devised a plan to get the assistance of "Orange Country" to aid us in defending humanity.

Do you recall that link-up of astronauts in space in 1975? It was the only way we could think of to share information with "Orange Country" about the threat from the aliens. To our knowledge, they hadn't yet encountered the aliens; so we needed proof that they existed.

Some crazy scientist at Apogee Components figured out that the aliens would be monitoring that space link-up mission. And sure enough, they did show up. It was profound evidence, and we were able to convince "Orange Country" that the threat from the aliens was real. That day was the beginning of the end of Cold War.

Senator, it was pure luck that we did have the SR-72 Darkbird in our arsenal at the time. It gave us some limited defense against the aliens when they flew down into our atmosphere. It was fast and maneuverable enough to chase away the alien UFOs. We haven't been able to shoot any of them down, but we are getting close to that point.

The scientists at Apogee Components are working on some new weapons that they think will be able to terminate the UFO threat. That is why you need to spend money on their non-military rocket vehicles; so they can funnel the profits into the black programs the CIA has them working on. Senator, they're doing great things for our planet, and they need to be rewarded for it.

SR-72 Darkbird imageSenator, this gets us to the legislative bill coming before congress this week. As you know, this bill would authorize; or rather "force" NASA to send astronauts back to the moon. In the CIA's opinion, this would be a terrible mistake. We know the aliens are out there in space. We can defend ourselves when they enter our atmosphere; but we cannot defend astronauts when they leave low earth orbit. They would be sitting ducks for the aliens.

So Senator, it is our opinion that the US population would be horrified if our astronauts were blown up on their way to the moon. It would be better for the time being to kill the bill in congress. You might say that money is better spent giving the elderly more health care.

As you might guess Senator, the alien threat has been a reason why NASA has not sent men to the moon since 1972. There has been a lot of pressure from space geeks, but the CIA, acting with previous administrations have been able to thwart those efforts up to now.

We fully expect that we'll develop a way to protect the astronauts in the future, but for now, we can't admit the aliens exist -- not yet anyway.

We need the status quo in place a little while longer yet. We need to continue to send men into low earth orbit to construct the new particle weapon being placed aboard the "International Space Station." It will become our staging point for future operations against the aliens.

But we can't risk going to the moon right now. It might expose everything and send the planet into a terrified panic. If that happens, who is going to pay their income taxes? Without money Senator, we won't be able to pay contractors like Apogee Components to develop the technology to defend our planet.

Senator, please vote "no" on the NASA appropriations bill this week.



Tools needed to assemble the SR-72 Darkbird Rocket Kit

  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Scissors
  • Hobby Knife - X-Acto with #11 Blade
  • Adhesives - Wood Glue or White Glue
  • Finishing Supplies like sanding sealer, paint and sandpaper (200 and 400 grit).
To Launch This Rocket Kit, You'll Also Need:
  • Launch Pad & Controller - See below for recommended choices.
  • Recovery Wadding - Disposable | Reusable
  • Rocket Motors - See the motor selection table below.
Optional tools to make building and flying the rocket easier:

Frequently Asked Questions about the SR-72 Darkbird


Get the Sky Complete Launch Pad and Controller here!Q: What launch pad should I use to launch this kit?
A: We recommend the Sky Launch System. This smaller rocket flies just fine off this inexpensive launch pad.

Learn how to select rocket motorsQ: I need help selecting motors. What should I do? Can you teach me how to select them myself?
A: Watch this YouTube video - How to Select Model Rocket Engines

We encourage you to learn the proper motor selection technique. Please watch our YouTube video that will walk you step-by-step through the process


SR-72 Darkbird - 13mm Engines

Use the chart below to help determine which motor to use for this kit.
Estimated Altitude Predictions generated using RockSim

Click the headers to sort up and down. Shift-click to sort multiple columns.
Use the drop down boxes below the headings to filter the list to specific criteria.
Motor Manuf.
/Case
Color Comment Altitude Delay* Price Buy Now!
1/2A3-2T
#05755
Estes
Single Use
--
First Flight
No Data Available
See Motor
$11.01
4 pack
A3-4T
#05756
Estes
Single Use
--
No Data Available
See Motor
$11.01
4 pack
A10-3T
#05757
Estes
Single Use
--
No Data Available
See Motor
$11.01
4 pack

Rocket motors are sold separately from the kit. For more help in selecting rocket motors, see our video tutorial. If you're unsure, start with the "First Flight" recommendation or the one with the lowest altitude, then go up from there.


RockSim File

No RockSim File currently Available.

What is a RockSim Design file?

The RockSim software gives you a lot of information about the flight characteristics of this rocket: how high, how fast, where it will land, how will it react to wind, etc. The "design file" is intended to save you time. All the parameters (size, shape, weight, fin design, etc.) of this rocket have already been entered into the RockSim program, and saved as an electronic database file. You can just open it up in your copy of RockSim and start loading different rocket motors to run launch simulations. It's fun and educational to see the rocket zoom skyward, even before you built it. For more information about RockSim and to download a FREE 30-day demo version, click here.


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Mon, 25 May 2015 09:11:20 -0600GMT
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